Winners 2016 VMODERN Furniture Design Competition

eVolo Magazine is pleased to announce the winners of the 2016 VMODERN Furniture Design Competition. The award recognizes innovative design and creates a forum for the discussion and development of the discipline.  What is the future of furniture design?

eVolo Magazine received 165 entries from 28 different countries. The Jury selected 3 winners and 20 honorable mentions.

The FIRST PLACE was awarded to David Beirne, Canan Karahasanoglu, and Trayan Andonov Haralanov from the United Kingdom and Turkey for the design of Wave-Part, a luminous wireframe developed around the principles of generative parametric design and fractal growth. The core modular form and interconnectivity of the fixture facilitates its adaptive development from the singular entity to the collective of multi entity arrangements, right through to entire lighting systems.

Emmanuel Osorno from the United States received the SECOND PLACE for his project lightCAGE, a pendant light that poses itself as a body in tension with the light that inhabits it. The quintessential conflicting duality of lamps, housing vs light, is reframed to form an object that is inherently defiant of the light source as the primordial element: it forces it to reside within its ribs, diffracting its rays as they escape. As the shadows of its geometry are casted over its surroundings, lightCAGE is able to augment its presence in space.

The THIRD PLACE was awarded to Maria Smigielska and Pierre Cutellic from Switzerland for the design of ROD, a front desk digitally fabricated using robots to bend steel rods. This project is an investigation on the use of robots for specialized fabircation techniques that allow the use of traditional materials in a novel way.

The members of the Jury are: Brad Ascalon [principal Brad Ascalon Studio NYC], Jonas Bjerre-Poulsen [partner Norm.Architects], Peter Donders [principal Peter Donders, Morphs, Morphsine], Kasper Rønn von Lotzbeck [partner Norm.Architects], David Trubridge [principal David Trubridge].

Wave-Part Light

Wava Light

Wava Light

First Place
2016 VMODERN Furniture Design Competition

David Beirne, Canan Karahasanoglu, Trayan Andonov Haralanov
United Kingdom, Turkey

An investigation into the possibilities for the future of light!

Throughout our relatively short history of having controlled electrical light, our curiosity has been to study and understand what are the physical scientific theory’s underpinning light itself. To the development of engineering ability to produce light, and the design of how the forms of light should be applied and utilized to the requirements, ambitions, and desires of the human need as it develops.

The progression of these three throughout the 19th century lead to the understanding of the quantum mechanics of light, the development of filament bulb types and the electrified enlightenment human lives.

”Wave-Part” is an elemental light fixture at its core, with a strong reference to these three key attributers in defining its position as a true light of the future.

The future of all commercial objects must be in there adaptiveness, whereby they have the ability to provide consumers with an experience that can generate long lasting emotional engagements and attachments. This is a philosophy that is central to the idea of “Wave – Part”. The core modular form and interconnectivity of the fixture facilitates its adaptive development from the singular entity to the collective of multi entity arrangements, right through to entire lighting systems.

Referencing the refractive nature of light itself, the form of “Wave-Part” is a structure of intersecting linear lines, with the overall wireframe form taking reference from an object that has been used throughout the history of the electric light as a diffuser, that being the cut crystal.

The modularity of the diamond shape of “Wave-Part”, has been developed around the principles of generative parametric design and fractal growth.

Be expressed and secondly the occur in the interaction with light. There is a clear and sustained consumer desire towards both the physical design of how light is represented in 3D form and the technological advance the fundamentals of light.

Wava Light

Wava Light

LightCAGE

lightCAGE

lightCAGE

Second Place
2016 VMODERN Furniture Design Competition

Emmanuel Osorno
United States

Emerging from a desire to manipulate the uncontainable, immaterial properties of light, lightCAGE Pendant poses itself as a body in tension with the light that inhabits it. The quintessential conflicting duality of lamps, housing vs light, is reframed to form an object that is inherently defiant of the light source as the primordial element: it forces it to reside within its ribs, diffracting its rays as they escape. As the shadows of its geometry are casted over its surroundings, lightCAGE is able to augment its presence in space.

Geometry
Beginning as a simple primary surface with a strong symmetrical character, lightCAGE was subtly sculpted to achieve a disruptive, yet delicate asymmetry along one axis to imbue it with a slight dynamism. With the goal of manipulating the light from within, the surface was then articulated and subdivided into an alternating pattern of ribs and slits along the sides of the shade. The ribs are then fused together by three transverse structural rings.

Effect
lightCAGE distributes light in two ways: first, the bottom 6in round aperture diffuses light evenly for focused downlighting and, second, the apertures along the sides disperse a lively ambient light. Once the light is turned on, the closely-spaced, narrow slits on the shade’s body diffract the beams of light as they pass through, forcing them to divide and combine with each other, thus creating a patterned array of light and shadows in surfaces within close proximity. Furthermore, the affair between symmetry and asymmetry makes it inherently perspectival: as a person moves around the space, its sequential apertures disclose varying vantage points of the bulb and the rib cage, altering the person’s perception of the shade.

Fabrication
A working prototype was built using a desktop 3D printer in combination with a series of analog tools. The lamp was surgically split into smaller parts to accommodate for the printer bed while avoiding the use of supports. A total of 24 parts were printed in PLA, then bonded together, plastered, and sanded to achieve a seamless monocoque structure. The assembly was completed with a series of secondary components that hold the socket, lock the shade in place, and eases the pressure on the cord. The ability to prototype the lamp was an important part of the design, and it is a testament to the opportunity brought forth by 3D printing to customize the space we live in to reflect our very own sensibilities.

Lighting facts
Wattage: 40W
Bulb Type: Globe Edison Bulb, Cage Filament
Color Temp: 2700K
Lumen Output: 160lm
Voltage: 120V
Dimming: 0-10V
Cord Length: 15’-0”

lightCAGE

lightCAGE

ROD: rod-bended front desk

Rod: rod-bended front desk

Rod: rod-bended front desk

 

Third Place
2016 VMODERN Furniture Design Competition

Maria Smigielska, Pierre Cutellic
Switzerland

This design and fabrication furniture project started as a research for a commission to complete the space of an Art & Architecture gallery in Paris. The immediate contextual constraints made such a project to blur disciplines and codes between scales, resolutions functions and materiality. Its main requirements were to function both as a front desk, and a landing step for a sur-elevated corridor, while avoiding an existing structural post. Two main horizontal planes were then used to drive the shape and derive a proto-structural envelope to be optimized and play with the site conditions. Following an integral design strategy, we then iteratively optimized this envelope, constrained by the two planes and their applied forces, to both provoke an architectonic directional behavior reflecting the inner façade of the gallery space, and construct structural conditions (cantilevering, anchorage, u-shape  beam assembly, 3d truss elements). To follow such design logic, we opted for one single material component —  metal rod — of one single standard size – 6mm diameter and 990mm length —  which would be subject to differentiations in space through the single process of non-standard roboticized rod bending, and TIG welded on site. From there, started an intensive research between volumetric and surface design readings, morphostructal varied grids and differentiation, multi-resolution continuities, simulation and robotic fabrication.

The final furniture is a desk of 5.5m length, 1.4m width and 0.75m height. Its structural performances are not overemphasized but rather used to amplify its relations with the surrounding space. While functional and flowing directionally with the circulations of the gallery, its material conditions and fabrication process makes it both a sequential, standard and industrial object, and a differentiated one. Its morphostructural state, halfway between volumetric and surfacic, structural, ornamental and functional makes it a deeper object to reflect the artistic content hosted by the gallery itself.

Rod: rod-bended front desk

Rod: rod-bended front desk

Fenn Chair

Fenn Chair

Fenn Chair

Honorable Mention
2016 VMODERN Furniture Design Competition

Blond Ltd
United Kingdom

The Product Story
The Fenn Chair is a modern interpretation of classic archetypes and processes, an elegant stacking chair that has been stripped back to the essential features. This minimal design utilises the processes of molded plywood lamination and steam-bending, with no visible joints and fittings.The result is an honest design that is sensitive to modern-day use and manufacturing. A concealed ability to stack eight allows the Fenn Chair to work well in both domestic and commercial applications.

The narrative of this chair is drawn from its stacking nature. The chair has a scallop on the underside of the steam-bent oak legs to allow the chairs to nestle together securely. This crescent shape also provides a grip area for the user. Within the color choices the detail/narrative is emphasized, the scallop is left uncolored; as if the legs were painted then the scallop cut away.

Materiality
Materials were chosen for consideration due to their compelling nature. We looked for tactile and emotive materials that would be at home in a modern interior. We allowed the materials suited to the purpose to inform our design choices and shape the product, to ensure an honest design and longevity.

Size and Ergonomics
Once a direction had been decided upon, we used full scale volumetric models and 3D prints to influence our design refinement. A process that moves fluidly between physical and digital to establish the perfect size and form.

Overall Dimensions
Height: 810mm
Width: 483mm
Length: 511mm
Seat Height (mid-point, with cushion): 473mm

Fenn Chair

Fenn Chair

Kytos Chair

Kytos Chair

Kytos Chair

Honorable Mention
2016 VMODERN Furniture Design Competition

Patrick Danahy
United States

Functionally gradient materials have produced new possibilities in terms of design. A form can be read as continuous, while its material properties shift in nature throughout. In this example, the kytos chair creates a continuous hollow form that varies in material to fulfill structural needs. Utilizing additive manufacturing technology, this design pushes the boundaries of the machine to seamlessly transition from a standard PLA plastic filament to a flexible rubber substitute. This transition maintains the object’s continuity, while varying its function to support needs for both structure and comfort. As weight is applied to kytos the double curvature and open faces act as supports, allowing the chair to flex on its central axis while maintaining the rigid structure of its ends.

Additive manufacturing allows for decentralization of production. The future of additive manufacturing opens possibilities of users accessing this design simply by pressing the “print” button. This concept returns value to the intellectual property itself, rather than the physical object. In this future economic system, design is inherently valued and must be held at the forefront.

The open face form of kytos allows for stacking and grouping of this element to create social clusters. This opportunity for stacking comes from the nature of the parametric form generator, which transforms a panelized box system into subdivided surfaces with open faces maintaining the boundaries of the original box form. This three-dimensional spatial boundary allows for optimal compatibility with the additive technologies.

Computer generated patterns texture the continuous surface, bringing light and reflection onto the otherwise simple form. This light penetrates through into the hollow form, creating a cloud-like glowing effect. The texture adapts to the surface curvature, opening and closing with the increase in the derivative of curvature.

Kytos Chair

Kytos Chair

Torso Magnetic Chair

Torso Chair

Torso Chair

Honorable Mention
2016 VMODERN Furniture Design Competition

Kim Minjae
Hong Kong

Philosophy and Concept
Sigmund Freud said that the chair is a secret discipliner who control the mind by regulating a human body sitting. As he said, the chair secretly has given a lot of influence deeply into our mind.

The chair is the most closely contacted stuffs to our bodies followed by clothes. It is also the piece of furniture that contacts with our bodies for the longest time. In addition, they play many roles beyond the function which support our bodies.

Among the many discourses about the chair, there has been a fairly convincing logic that the chair allows determining the relationship of the people. Indeed, designers would design with the intent. Historically, according to the appearance of the chair, the users’ positions and powers had revealed. In the Rome Era, the chair of the king and his servants were different. At this time, even around the table of the Roman family, a sofa was for the father, a recliner for the mother and stools for the children whilst eating. In modern time, differences in rank were distinguished by the size of the chair and comfort of the back seat.

In addition, not only the hidden role that determines the relationship between people, but also the chair designed to tame the body, depending on the type of work. The Chair for office workers are designed with the key factor that have to be able to work with concentration for a long hours. The chair for the students are designed to regulate their bodies so that students are also able to achieve a long intensive learning in school.

Like this, for the future chairs that have a deep impact on our minds, I wanted to create a chair that respects for the dignity of human nature not revealing any background conditions. This chair does not show any positions and power status, also does not want the efficiency of work. It is rather the mediator that allows users ask themselves the dignity of human nature. To do so, first, the various gestures that the traditional chair legs express are omitted by removing the legs. Thus, the human legs’ gestures replace the chairs’ expressions. In addition, the seat and the seatback are similar to the human body’s parts. Now the chair express its own aura like a powerful gesture of the torso.

Materials and High-Technology
In order to make the chair seat that legs are omitted, the latest magnetic technology is applied.  The flexible magnetic films are inserted in the seat and the floor plate respectively. The magnetic power of the two parts allow the seat and seatback are fixed in the air tightly. And the two members are tied with carbon fiber threads which are stronger than steel, but much lighter than aluminum.

The GFRC (Glass Fiber Reinforced Concrete) is chosen as the materials for the seat and seatback because concrete is appropriate at expressing the neutral character and glass fibers add flexibility as well as lightness into the concrete.

The floor plate is made of wood which is widely used material for chairs. Lastly, by fitting the wooden floor plate in the steel frame with handles on both side, the chair is completed.

Torso Chair

Torso Chair

Sydney Opera Bar VIP Centerpiece

Sydney Opera Bar VIP Centerpiece

Sydney Opera Bar VIP Centerpiece

Honorable Mention
2016 VMODERN Furniture Design Competition

Emily Leung, Manuel Muehlbauer
Australia

DESIGN
The Sydney Opera Bar VIP Centrepiece is a scaled down physical embodiment of the iconic Opera House in Sydney. This re-interpretation reflects the aesthetics of the shell structures as a sculptural form and references to waves, integrating the context of the site and the poetry of opera music in a vital relationship. It also expresses the long story of architecture, which requires the collaborative practice between the areas of design, engineering and manufacturing to successfully manifest architectural artefacts.

COMPUTATIONAL DESIGN + DIGITAL FABRICATION
The unique geometry forming the elegant shells of the sculptural Sydney Opera Bar VIP Centrepiece could only be achieved through the application of computational methods during the constrained period of time. Coupling rapid prototyping based on 3D printing and computational design methods based on parametric design and scripting into a holistic digital fabrication approach, provides a highly relevant methodology for the computational design of complex geometries in the context of product and architectural design. Furthermore, the interconnected workflow between high-end modelling and digital fabrication processes reveal the potential of mass customization to drive the evolution from mass production to individualized fabrication methodologies for building components.

COLLABORATION
Parametric modelling combined with structural analysis and optimisation tools create new opportunities for communication and interaction, while connecting the areas of design and engineering. Therefore, the initial model, as basis for the design process of this project, was created in Rhinoceros and Grasshopper. The computational model was developed in a collaborative approach of the designers together with those collaborators, who focused on integrating the computational engineering methods into the design process. Developing the original script with the Grasshopper plugin Karamba as parametric structural engineering tool, established the capacity for analysis of structural properties as well as optimization of the overall structure and the structural nodes, which both must withstand the heavy use of the bar table.

PROCESS
Assembled from three elements (timber struts, acrylic table top and 3D printed nodes), many design iterations were leading the connected subsystems from the original design to the built product. The reality of designing and building complex objects is ensconced in the Sydney Opera Bar VIP Centrepiece as embodiment of the non-linear design process that enforces deeper exploration during design iterations, allowing creative decision making to take place in a collaborative approach shared between all parties. Even though methods of advanced modelling and manufacturing have great potential in creating complex geometries, a more important aspect on this journey was the potential for quick, continuous adjustments, simulation and prototyping to incorporate the reactive capacity to deal with the contingency encountered in complex systems. Regardless, the experience of building the Sydney Opera Bar VIP Centrepiece led to a highly integrated design approach between engineers, architects and manufacturers, without which the final outcome would have never been achieved.

CONCLUSION
We believe that just like the remarkable story of the making of the Sydney Opera House, contemporary design processes based on collaboration and computational design methods provide an exciting experience during the realisation of highly complex design outcomes.

Sydney Opera Bar VIP Centerpiece

Sydney Opera Bar VIP Centerpiece

Multi-Tier Shelf System

Multi-Tier Shelf System

Multi-Tier Shelf System

Honorable Mention
2016 VMODERN Furniture Design Competition
Ammar Kalo
United Arab Emirates

The Multi-Tier Shelf System has Maple shelves that rest on vertical slanting legs without any hardware connections. They’re pinned to the topmost shelve with a custom-made solid brass pins, which allows the legs to fold down for flat pack shipping. These Maple legs organically grow from the horizontal top surface, and drop down to the ground. The connection points where more than two pieces come together are either highlighted with the manipulation of it’s surrounding to create a ‘soft’ formal response, or a tectonic expression that elegantly that fuses members together. Also, the shelves have inset camel leather collars that snugly hug the legs to prevent them from sliding down. Additional shelves could be installed at different heights with exact hole patterns that match the leg slant angles.

Multi-Tier Shelf System

Multi-Tier Shelf System

Lotus: A Kinetic Luminary Object

Lotus: A Kinetic Luminary Object

Lotus: A Kinetic Luminary Object

Honorable Mention
2016 VMODERN Furniture Design Competition

Reza Mousavy
United States

Lotus is a kinetic luminary object that can change its light effect by an operable mechanism. As the operable mechanism is applied, it is gradually empowered by energy, unfolds, and releases the light. The object includes two parts. While the blossoming luminary upper part changes the impact of the light, the lower base defines the relationship between the object and the ground and provides stability for the object.

The object’s parts are made of aluminum and plastic and are assembled by bolt and screw. Aluminum is used for the internal structure of the object due to its strength and lightness. This aluminum skeleton, connected to the aluminum base, not only integrates the rest of the object’s parts but also carries the operable mechanism of the object. In order not to disturb the impact of the light, the internal operable mechanism is made of transparent plastic. However, the kinetic exterior envelope of the object operated by this internal mechanism is made of translucent plastic to capture the effect of the light.

To construct the object, different techniques are applied. While the base is a cast aluminum piece, the internal structure is cut by water jet from aluminum sheets. Besides, lasercamm machine is used to cut plastic parts for the internal mechanical system and exterior envelope. The accuracy of the cutting machines (water jet and lasercamm) helps the internal geometry of the movement to be executed precisely.

Lotus: A Kinetic Luminary Object

Lotus: A Kinetic Luminary Object

 

Caustics Chair

Caustics Chair

Caustics Chair

Honorable Mention
2016 VMODERN Furniture Design Competition

Joel Wong Liang Zhou, Amanda Gunawan
United States

The caustics chair combines the resilient ideologies of modernism whilst simultaneously, testing the threshold of our society’s technological capacities. Who says one has to exist without the other?

The key structural component of this chair is a single, continuous and bent 1-inch thick aluminum tube. 500 points line this tube and with each point is its corresponding “alter ego” point. They are then joint by a 1-millimeter thick nylon wire. These 250 nylon wires proceed to create a new surface that forms and completes the caustic chair.

These network of wires mimic the illusion of a volume. One that is light, seamless and almost non-existent. We are perpetually reminded of the beauty of this simple connection between points in space. A simple operation resulting in an intricate geometric form resembling light rays refracting off an object to create a network of caustics. The caustics chair achieves the same result of distinct highlights and shadows and this effect transforms as the viewer changes their position relative to the chair.

The caustics chair is ergonomic, allowing one to comfortably sink into the chair, personalizing the experience to the natural contour of one’s body. It is innovative, allowing technology to aid us in a precision that would otherwise be impossible. And most importantly, it is in tangent with the modernist principles; particularly, the beauty in simplicity. Let’s design a chair that works.

Caustics Chair

Caustics Chair

Claw Chair

Claw Chair

Claw Chair

Honorable Mention
2016 VMODERN Furniture Design Competition

Maryam Houda
Australia

WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF FURNITURE DESIGN?

-Impact of digital manufacturing technologies-Additive manufacturing giving rise to innovation
-Direct connection between digital and physical/material
– Mass production to mass customisation
-Labour cost effective detailing
-Re-linking design thinking and making
– Impossible to possible-bespoke, complex designs that could not be produced at the human scale
-Efficient, rapid and precise production
-Shift in production, accessibility and distribution
-Minimal waste by product- more possibility for use of recycled materials

In a modern world that has been thriving on mass production and the assembly line of the 20th century, the introduction of digital additive manufacturing technologies in the last 100 years has given rise to a disruption in the way traditional designers and mass-manufacturers think, make and distribute. Additive manufacturing has thus, fashioned a union between the skilled craftsmanship of traditional designers, and the efficiency of mass-production in order to meet customized demands.

The Claw demonstrates how additive processes have allowed for a direct connection between the digital and material world. No longer exists the disciplinary concerns of authorship, agency and the age old challenges of information translation between design and making.

What this offers in regards to furniture design is that the introduction of parametric form-finding, allows for quick design changes to be made digitally in order to customize products or objects, allowing for a more efficient work flow. Thus, the designer has more control and agency over the project’s design and construction stage, where the translation of digital inputs are directly communicated and read by the 3d printer, ultimately producing a physical output. Hence, what The Claw exhibits is that the future of furniture design will shift away from mass standardized products and push towards mass customisation without the hefty price tag attached.

The Claw is made entirely from PLA (polylactic acid), an organic and recyclable material, 3-dimensionally extruded to mimic the materials recyclability, melting and reforming into a customised form. It was designed explicitly and ergonomically from three, 2-dimensional curves in order to accommodate the human reclining body.

It glows in the dark to intensify its permeability, slimness and minimalistic design, but is in fact, structurally self-supportive. The material’s cellular distribution varies in porosity and density where areas that require structural support are designed to have a denser cell agglomeration, allowing for more material to bear the stress load such as the:

1. Back Rest (BR)
2. Seat (S)
3. Chair Spine (CS)
4. Edges (E)

By familiarizing additive technologies with furniture design, 3d printing opens up new ways of manufacturing as well as new business models, where regular people are able to access tools of design and production. It allows for the opportunity for furniture design files to be shared online, downloaded and customized in order to meet individual preferences.

When perceived at an industrial scale, the potentials of additive manufacturing offer greater opportunities and outcomes. With the introduction of robotic arm fabrication, programmed with 3D material extrusion as a successor of the 3d printer, the print space expands larger than the printer itself and is no longer bound to the limited scale of workspace. This means that larger furniture could be printed as one object rather than in pieces.

With only one material and minimal waste, The Claw displays that the simplistic process of making will surely supersede existing fabrication processes, paving the way for further sustainability and cost-effective bespoke forms. Furniture making will see that the implementation of digital additive manufacturing will in fact, become a desired necessity.

Claw Chair

Claw Chair

Band-Rail

Band-Rail

Band-Rail

Honorable Mention
2016 VMODERN Furniture Design Competition
VG Studio – Victoria Goldstein
United States

“Band-Rail” ripples effortlessly through space while holding considerable book weight.  Colorful book covers and magazines add beauty to the living room area in this little loft apartment, and adorn the rhythmic repetitive character of the handrail’s vertical components.  Storage space is integrated to the staircase and generates an elegant and vibrant environment.

The form begins with a simple elongated prism that ‘blobs’ out near arms reach while climbing the stairs or walking past them, and then bulges back in where the user can’t reach to grab a book. Such association between both bodies, the living and the inert, generates a decorative yet functional play; where the eye recognizes difference and the hand can comfortably reach.

The handrail-bookshelf is a regularly spaced aggregation of flat and slender pieces, it appears simple and crisp when viewed from the front yet reveals a full body when seen at an angle.  This sculptural quality allows for the object to appear as an architectural feature, which is both usable and smooth to look at.  Many iterations were run to determine appropriate structural deviation within the pieces, adding weight with backing and shelving features wherever the main structural gills ‘blob out’, and removing shelving weight elsewhere, thus arriving to an optimized moment between structural layout and aesthetics.

The tone of wood maintains a calid ambiance and is light enough to reveal some shades projected in between the pieces, orchestrating an overall ‘curvy’ rhythm between matter and void, between light and the absence of it.  The piece provides compositional variation depending on the viewers’ position, from skeleton to skin as the ‘gills’ separate and recompose.  Bookshelves tend to be visually heavy and stagnant but ‘band-rail’ lets air flow around it and users see through.

Detox the building process
Made of wooden ‘gills’ and supported by a minimal steel beam the handrail is mechanically fastened and brought to site in a few pre-assembled pieces that fit inside a standard car.  The wood was selected to optimize automated router cutting considering variables of thickness, grain and softness. No glue, no tint, and router-refined edges to prevent sanding make the building process seamless.  Joints are coupled in between components through shape and precision; resulting in the detox of the process.

 

An addition of simple generative and fabrication steps make “Band rail” eye candy and the resulting fabrication process keep it clean to share space with.

 

Credits
Design: VG Studio – Victoria Goldstein
Rendering: Munjer Hashim
Local Architect: Luciana Melicchio
Fabrication: LaBotegatienda

Band-Rail

Band-Rail

Filament Chair

Filament Chair

Filament Chair

Honorable Mention
2016 VMODERN Furniture Design Competition

Luis Alberto Menéndez Sánchez
Ecuador

Filament Chair is a contemporary design based on creating complex three-dimensional geometries from a two-dimensional designed pattern. As a general strategy, the design is made up of several components, so the chair is created by twelve components that essentially are the same. However, they have different size and complexity according to their location, these changes respond to aesthetics and ergonomics needs. Therefore, the design of the component was crucial to ensure that it can be easily joined to create a large-scale project.

Kirigami and Origami were applied during the development of the component. These methods in combination with digital simulations and computational design tools were used during the design process. In essence, these techniques transform a two-dimensional surface into a three-dimensional object through a series of folds. These folds create a 3D volume with surprising strength and kinetic properties. The component design started with a huge geometrical exploration that was done with physical and digital models. After several experiments, the result was a pattern with good structural features and interesting aesthetics characteristics.

The design strategy goes further than make simple folds on a surface. Specific patterns and cuts that were carefully designed on the surface of the component create several filaments that can be folded and manipulated in order to add complexity to the component. These filaments become the main part of the design because thanks to their versatility, they can be pulled and connected with other filaments to create a soft surface that a chair needs.

The component has a triangular design in 2d, and it forms a tetrahedron when it is folded. It was designed to increase the number of union points; instead of having three, it has six joints because the vertices of the component have a bifurcation. Besides, the filaments are the main points of connection because each filament can be connected with the filaments of the closest component.

The components are made up of three levels of structural hierarchy. The main structure works as a tripod, the secondary structure brings stability in the base, and the filament layer adds complexity and stability to the overall shape. The main structure is thicker than the others due to the fact that its purpose is to hold the vertical load. This is the principal connection point of the whole structure. The secondary structure is less thick than the main structure and is located on the edges. This layer closes the triangle on the base and makes the component more stable. The third layer is made of several pieces that create the filaments. It is located between the primary and the secondary structure. Its main purpose is to work as an ornament and is the most aesthetical part of the component; however, it is also the part that has the most connection points in order to stabilize the whole design. As a result, the component is highly complex and have multiple ways of connection.

Filament chair is created by joining twelve components together. According to their function, the components have different sizes and features. There are six components that form the base and six that form the backrest. This design shows how the combination of ancient arts and contemporary design tools bring a new aesthetic language and opens an interesting panorama for the contemporary design.

Filament Chair

Filament Chair

Slip Sofa

Slip Sofa

Slip Sofa

Honorable Mention
2016 VMODERN Furniture Design Competition

Dionysus Cho, Hyeun Lee
Canada, United States

Slip reimagines the conventional living room couch seating arrangement for the modern city dweller – making room for our pet companions.  Accommodating for the lifestyle of the pet lover, Slip is a furniture piece that provides for both.

Sñip peels apart an elegantly flowing seating surface to create a comfortable pet niche.  A soft felt layer follows the smooth curves of the seat on the left end, transitioning into a hammock-like tensile fabric structure on the opposing end.  Slip provides a perfect private space for the tired puppy to sneak a nap or the affectionate cat in need of some alone time.

By splitting a single surface, two resultant surfaces create a division that allows for people and their pets to occupy Slip at different levels.  Utilizing the residual space taken up by the base of the typical furniture form, two different environments housed in a single piece is a gesture appreciated by the space conscious millennial.

Constructed with the bare minimum of formal articulations, two powder-coated black steel frames holds up a flowing and ergonomically tuned steel structural form as if floating.  Wrapped seamlessly in a thin memory foam cushioning and upholstered in a likewise seamless fabric, comfort is not sacrificed for form.  Below, the formed felt wrap creates a warm and soft cushioned bed, providing the give required for the selective cat to find its perfect sleeping posture.  Crafted as a removable piece, the pet layer can be detached quickly for easy cleaning or replacement.

Slip is a single beautiful piece with an embedded duality – a distinct appreciation for our beloved pets.

Slip Sofa

Slip Sofa

Stratum Chair

Stratum Chair

Stratum Chair

Honorable Mention
2016 VMODERN Furniture Design Competition

Ammar Kalo
United Arab Emirates

The Stratum Chair was born out of a desire to create a piece of furniture that expresses its function and the material it uses in a very organic fashion, while taking advantage of advanced CNC milling and fabrication technologies. Its unique formal and visual qualities are born out of the ways in which the plywood strata layers are carved to highlight the chair’s functional features. Its termination at the ground with three legs also accentuates the design’s edginess and give it a sense of delicate balance.

For this design, there were a number of sources that helped inspire its formal qualities; from the sinuous shapes of a human body, to the works of Hector Guimard, to rock formations carved by natural forces. In addition, the inspiration for the interlocking connection joint came from studying religious book stands that are carved from a single piece of wood and feature two interlocking parts. The swiveling action of the chair also helps reduce its original volume by half, making it easier for shipping.

The main parts of the design are composed of laminated sheets of Baltic Birch plywood. Most of the features of the chair, its sharp edges, flowing form of its back and seat, as well as the central interlocking joint were designed to leverage the extra axis of freedom that a 5-axis CNC milling machine offers. Multiple iterations of those features were produced made to properly calibrate their fabrication process while maintaining a strong design language.

Stratum Chair

Stratum Chair

Almost Natural Things – Chair

Almost Natural Things

Almost Natural Things

Honorable Mention
2016 VMODERN Furniture Design Competition

Faysal Tabbarah, Nada Taryam, Khawla Al Hashimi
United Arab Emirates

This collection of chairs is from a series of objects designed under the research agenda titled Almost Natural Things. The agenda explores the role of the Anthropocene and changes in the natural environment in the production and aesthetics of the built environment. This agenda asks how we can make things in that acknowledge the Anthropocene without being simple imitations of nature. These objects are designed to push the viewers to ask “where did this come from?” They want to have the essence of nature without necessarily mimicking a certain natural condition.

The agenda attempts to uncover a nebulous relationship between natural and synthetic things, thus blurring the binary of nature and culture. These objects investigate the role of computational design methodologies to question and transform normative everyday objects beyond simple function. These objects purposely leaps beyond structure and function to produce volumes of excess that exhibit an amplification of texture to override traditional part-to-whole relationships.

The fabrication method of these chairs consists of activating a volatile chemical condition t epoxy resin and Expanded Polystyrene (EPS). The exothermic reaction curing reaction causes the EPS to melt. The result is a highly textured surface condition that pushes the viewer to consider whether these objects are synthetic or actually natural.  This reaction also creating an automatic and quick de-molding process.

Almost Natural Things

Almost Natural Things

Raygon Lamp

Raygon Lamp

Raygon Lamp

Honorable Mention
2016 VMODERN Furniture Design Competition

Mohanned Iskanderani
Saudi Arabia

With the increased and fast pace technology is evolving in, its becoming more important everyday to shift and focus our attention as designers  to all the advance tools we are offered by our evolution. One of the evolutionary tools that has caught my attention is Parametric and Generative Design. Such tools can be implemented in Architecture, Furniture, Fashion, and every other design field. With the beautiful outcome of using such tools, an obsession was born to focus all my attention as a designer towards the parametric design world.

Raygon is an exploration into the parametric world. Its one of the first pieces designed with parametric design as an architect. Grasshopper has been a tool used in the architectural field intensely and RAYGON is advocating for using such a tool in the furniture design field. Raygon is but one piece from a huge collection made for a luxuries brand still underdevelopment to implement parametric design with the furniture world.  Once parametric design is implemented and the computer is allowed to design as much as a designer is, the outcome starts to become completely unpredictable and stunning.

Raygon has been fully designed with Grasshopper. The simple form, parametric openings, as well as the thickness were completely scripted. Such harmony in the way the openings get bigger and smaller is impossible to achieve without allowing the computer to chip-in in the design outcome. Raygon was designed as a sculpture that can look different from each side and announce its presence in the room it’s allowed to be in with its unusual shadows.

Raygon will be 3D printed with plastic powder as the result outcome has been tested previously for other lamps from the same family. Raygon is still under development for the finish material that will be sprayed to create a luxuries finish as well as the electrical parts on the bottom to allow the light bulb to sit inside the shell. With the implementation of scripted codes in creating furniture pieces, the idea of custom made furniture pieces also becomes much more easier. Once the input is changed, the finished product will completely change depending on script applied.

Raygon Lamp

Raygon Lamp

Concrete Pods

Concrete Pods

Concrete Pods

Honorable Mention
2016 VMODERN Furniture Design Competition

Anthony Iwaz, Joseph Sciascia, Joey Doherty
Canada

The future of furniture design is creating products that becomes one with its surrounding.

Presently, furniture is designed for anthropogenic purposes omitting its possibilities to welcome all forms of biology. Inspired by the structures created by superorganisms, the Concrete Pod was designed not only as a visual element but an entity that integrates into its space and adapts to its environment. Bold yet visually enticing, this piece is composed of concrete and presented as an outdoor seating. It is a study that questions the structural elements of furniture and challenges its integration with its environment.

We found the underground structures created by fire ant colonies to be the most interesting as they can span for miles on end, continuously intertwining and connecting multiple social organisms. Supported by its own shear weight, these immense underground communities are the end result of a superorganism that has physically adapted the environment to facilitate its basic needs. The Concrete Pod is not only conceived for the purpose of human use but also to accept and allow the adaption of its local biota. This adaption allows for a dynamic aesthetic that changes with its climate and season.

We were able to create such an organic form with the help of a 3D platform called Grasshopper. An algorithm was created to develop the composition in a controlled manner. Constantly manipulating the algorithm, we found a design that closely mimicked the colonies created by these super-organisms; a complex system of pathways and self-organized structures.

We conducted several material studies and concluded that this furniture piece would need to be cast in a mold. Concrete would be our best option due to its manipulability, durability and high compressive strength. More specifically, we wanted to control the structure of concrete; a material that has been used in the industry and sought out to be an “in-organic” material and turn it into something organic.

A negative version of the 3d model was manually carved out of an array of stacked foam-core sheets, then shaped with a modeling compound and poured with concrete. Learning from the results of our first prototypes, the modeling compound allowed us to create smoother surfaces adding to the aesthetic of the Concrete Pod.

Returning to the significance of superorganism structures and its embodiment with nature; the Concrete Pod invites biota becoming one with its surroundings.

Concrete Pods

Concrete Pods

Invertible Lamp

Invertible Lamp

Invertible Lamp

Honorable Mention
2016 VMODERN Furniture Design Competition

Ehsan Fatehifar
Iran

“With respect to Paul Schatz who discovered the inversion of the platonic solids including the invertible cube.”

The idea comes from inversion concept in mathematics and geometry. The spirit of the idea is a new version of the universe through inversion concept. These collection of ideas consists of new skins/façades, new furniture and beyond. I called them “invertibles”. Now here the first one as: Invertible Lamp

The triangle (Hexagonal) shape lamp, by inverting and cycling all over the time a multi-functional lamp designed based on invertible cube. This lighting fixture includes six tetrahedrons linked to each other by hinges and the wires passed through these parts. Each part consists of one Plexiglas side as the semi-opaque part and three wooden sides. One of the three wooden part is for installing LEDs and the adjacent one is a magnetic cap for every tetrahedron to provide access to the inside.

All in one lamp!
With using the invertible lamp you just buy one lamp as a desk lamp, night lamp, decorative lamp, wall based lamp, pendant lamp (if customized) and all the shapes in between. This lamp create a spectrum of illumination conditions individually from spot light to Omni light. You can rotate the lamp and enjoy all the shapes and lighting directions according to your comfortable and desired condition. It can enliven the life as it is just like a living creature just beside you everywhere.

Future Design: Generating New Forms and Patterns
New Forms designed by joining the basic samples with different phase of rotation. These new forms have different degrees of freedom and various three dimensional sides.

New patterns also generated by arranging the same samples which capable of covering new facades and creates surface lighting.

Invertible lamp not limited to this shape, Triangle (tetrahedrons) is the first one of a wide range of various shapes, materials and scales just in the lamp category of the invertibles group.

A new version of the universe “invertibles “introduced with a beam of light here.

Invertible Lamp

Invertible Lamp

Minimae Chair

Minimae Chair

Minimae Chair

Honorable Mention
2016 VMODERN Furniture Design Competition

Marta Krivosheek
United Arab Emirates

Minimae chair represents a simple yet highly sophisticated form that blurs the boundaries of top and bottom, offers multiple seating configurations and sets interesting seating options with a feeling of a past craftsmanship.

NATURE’S STRUCTURES
In nature the minimum energy principle is commonly observed in various living organisms and lifeless matter. Soap bubbles or their clusters have the tendency to minimize the area for a volume they enclose and thus producing shapes with least potential energy. Initially different types of minimal surfaces were studied in order to understand the logic and system possibilities. For the chair’s final shape, iterative computational form-finding process with minimal surface logic was  adopted, where different variables informed and optimized the composition based on a selected set of parameters.

MATERIALITY
“Shasha” is a fishing boat making and have been used for centuries along the east coast of the United Arab Emirates and Oman (Middle East). The “shoosh” with their flexibility can withstand the high seas and they will never sink. The art of Shasha making slowly disappears since 1970s in the region.  The boats are made of palm fronds, which are first properly dried and then soaked in a salty water for one week. Experienced craftsman assembles the material into the desired shape within one day.

Minimae Chair

Minimae Chair

3S9T Lamp

3S9T Lamp

3S9T Lamp

Honorable Mention
2016 VMODERN Furniture Design Competition

Martin Wong Tuong Ying
Malaysia

Three struts up in the air holding by strings create a tensional integrity that allow it to stand in position. Fluorescent fishing lines have been used to connect the struts and act as prestressed tensioned members to hold the structure from failure.  The ultraviolet light from both ends of each strut illuminate the fishing lines to form a few linear lights all around the struts.

It is a sculpture-like lighting that integrates the principle of tensegrity and lights. At the same time, it utilizes the characteristic of the materials to form an interesting geometric unit with illuminated profile lines. The glossiness of the struts bring with it elegancy as well as classiness.

3S9T Lamp

3S9T Lamp

Oculus Chair

Oculus Chair

Oculus Chair

Honorable Mention
2016 VMODERN Furniture Design Competition

Carla Rommelt, Abdulrahman Ali Harib
Germany, Qatar

Oculus void aims to create a constant eyeflow that drags ones sight in an infinite circle. Using the human eye as a reference, countries were extracted to create a balanced/symmetrical frame.

Contrast was avoided through choice of materials, steel and glass both share soft light reflection while the frame creates a gap under the seat.


 Using the eye as a reference, further observations were made revolving around its traits. Material choice reflected on the understanding of the traits. Glass provided ease and clarity similar to the permeable film that covers the pupil, finally the expanding fabric mimics the iris motion of expansion and contractions.

Oculus Chair

Oculus Chair

sLounge

sLounge

sLounge

Honorable Mention
2016 VMODERN Furniture Design Competition

Xiang Liu, Chi Yee Corliss Ng
United States

sLounge is a playful furniture for all. It serves as a center piece in a family, creating fun and intimate moment for kids and parents together. Rethinking the role of a furniture in a home, the problem of scales often comes up. There are multiple users in a home, sLounge questions the difference in scales between users. A standard chair is not a usable chair for young kids. A kids table is hardly a stool for an adult. sLounge is designed in a way that it addresses multiple scales. It can be shared by adults and kids at the same time. It is a piece of furniture which is scalable.

The scalability of the sLounge challenges the conventional pre-functioned furniture. In order to be scalable, the furniture has to be an un-predetermined object. It should be flexible and changeable with user’s imagination. It is a fixed piece yet initiate user’s movement, interactions and creativity. A shoe to fit all. In other words, one will never outgrow the sLounge.

The chair could be at 2 distinctive orientations, standing on the curved surface or the flat surface. Functions are suggestive while open to the users, depending on how the users approach the furniture.

When the chair is on the curved surface, it could be a rocking chair for both adult and kid. Gentle rocking movement could be shared and initiated by both parties. There is independence which each enjoy their own space while playfully connected to each other. Meanwhile, when the chair is laying on one of its flat surfaces, it is could be a lounge chair for the adult, could be a fun landscape for kids to climb and play with, could be both.

The natural wooden finish gives a unified, non-hierarchy surface, while the green felt provide a warm and soft finish suggesting users to occupy in different ways. The lightweight material allows kids and adults to flip the furniture and orient it in multiple ways. Felt turns and wrap around corners, providing soft corners.

sLounge is named which s will a smaller letter stands for smaller person, (i.e. kids) and L as big letter stands for bigger person (i.e. adults). Lounge is used because it means to let users relex yet it did not imply any specific functionality to the object. sLounge may have potential for more functions in one in the future development.

sLounge

sLounge

2016 Furniture Design Competition

WINNERS TO BE ANNOUNCED ON NOVEMBER 15, 2016

eVolo Magazine is pleased to invite designers around the world to participate in the 2016 VMODERN Furniture Design Competition. The award was born from the desire to create a forum for the discussion, debate and development of innovative design.  Our goal is to discover and promote the most creative pieces of furniture that will transform the way we live and interact with our environment. What is the future of furniture design?

This is an ideas competition and designers may submit pieces in production, prototypes, and/or concepts.  Projects will be evaluated based on creativity, originality, feasibility, function, and aesthetics.

Participants may submit the following designs:

  1. Seating: armchairs, benches, chairs, lounge chairs, recliners, stools, etc.
  2. Planes: beds, coffee tables, desks, shelving units, tables, etc.
  3. Lighting: ceiling lamp, floor lamp, table lamp, wall lamp, etc.

REGISTRATION

Participants must register by September 20, 2016
Early registration: US $75 until July 19, 2016
Late registration; US $95 from July 20, 2016 to September 20, 2016
One registration = one project
Participants may submit several projects, but must register each entry
There is no limit as to the number of participants per team. Individual entries are accepted

SCHEDULE

March 10, 2016 – Competition announcement, registration begins
July 19, 2016 – Early registration deadline
September 20, 2016 – Late registration deadline
September 27, 2016 – Submission deadline (23:59 hours US Eastern Time)
November 8, 2016 – Winner’s announcement

-> REGISTER YOUR TEAM

SUBMISSION REQUIREMENTS

This is a digital competition and no hardcopies are necessary. Entrants must submit their proposal no later than September 27, 2016 (23:59 hours US Eastern Time) via email to competition2016@vmodern.com.

The project submission must contain the following files:

  1. One board with the design information including 2D drawings and perspectives. Participants are encouraged to submit all the information they consider necessary to explain their design. The board should be 24″(h) X 48″(w) in HORIZONTAL format. The resolution of the boards must be 150 dpi, RGB mode and saved as JPG files. The upper right corner of the board must contain the participation number. There should not be any marks or any other form of identification. The file must be named after the registration number. For example: 0101.jpg.
  2. A DOC file containing the project statement (600 words max). This file must be named after the registration number followed by the word “statement”. For example: 0101-statement.doc.
  3. A DOC file containing the entrants’ personal information, including name, profession, address, and email. This file must be named after the registration number followed by the word “info”. For example: 0101-info.doc.
  4. All the files must be placed in a ZIP folder named after your registration number. For example:  0101.zip

JURY

Brad Ascalon [principal Brad Ascalon Studio NYC]. Brad Ascalon’s eponymous studio was founded in 2006. The multidisciplinary designer specializes in furniture for the contract, hospitality and residential markets, as well as lighting, packaging, and other consumer products. With a reductive approach to his craft, Ascalon believes in design that is uncomplicated, rational and manages to find the perfect balance of form, function and concept. Through this approach, coupled with a strong understanding of the business needs and opportunities of his clients, Ascalon is widely regarded as one of the leading American design voices of his generation. Working with clients ranging from global brands to start-ups, branding agencies and private clientele, Ascalon’s long list of collaborators has included such brands as Design Within Reach, Ligne Roset, Bernhardt Design, Holly Hunt, Stylex, Gaia & Gino, L’Oreal, Redken, Maybelline, Esquire Magazine and many others. Ascalon’s work has been exhibited around the world, from the global design hubs of Milan, Paris, London, Cologne, Stockholm and New York, to Chicago, Los Angeles, Guangzhou and Moscow, where in 2013 he was singlehandedly invited to represent American design with an installation at Moscow Design Week. Ascalon’s work has been featured in top publications including Wallpaper*, New York Times, Architectural Digest, Intramuros, Whitewall, Esquire, Surface, Dwell, Interior Design, Objekt, Interni, Ottagono, Elle Décor, Metropolis and many others. Born outside of Philadelphia, PA, Ascalon was immersed in the world of art and design from an early age. His grandfather was a noted sculptor and industrial designer, and his father is renowned for his large scale art installations that can be found in public and private spaces throughout North America. Ascalon attributes his passion for design to the two generations before him who instilled in him the value of craftsmanship and materiality. Ascalon earned a Masters’ degree for Industrial Design from New York’s Pratt Institute in 2005, and that same year was recognized by Wallpaper magazine as one of the “Ten Most Wanted” emerging designers in the world. Ascalon lives and works in New York, NY.

Jonas Bjerre-Poulsen [partner Norm.Architects]. Jonas has for a decade been working within a number of creative fields as both architect, designer, stylist, photographer and art director. With attention to haptic qualities and the human scale in interior architecture, Jonas always strives to create spectacular and striking spaces, that in their own minimal and understated fashion are very inviting and full of life, light and atmosphere. As a product designer, Jonas is driven by concept, materials and aesthetics, which has won Norm.Architects numerous prestigious awards such as Red Dot, IF Design Award, Design Plus Award, Good Design Award. As an architectural photographer and stylist, Jonas works for several brands and a large number of international magazines such as Elle Decor, Dwell, Kinfolk, Vouge and many more. Jonas graduated as an architect from the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts in 2004, holds a degree in business administration and languages from Copenhagen Business School and studied art and philosophy in Rome before co-founding Norm.Architects.

Peter Donders [principal Peter Donders, Morphs, Morphsine]. The work of Peter Donders is possibly the best example of how traditional craftsmanship and computer technology can work together. With a love of organic forms and a solid base in design construction and style, Peters uses the latest computer graphic technology to bring to life his ideas in 3 dimensions. From a simple set of furniture to the full 1000+ seats of a major theater (Grace, Amsterdam) requires an exacting approach and irrefutable quality standards. Without his technological skill and eye for form the pieces Bench & Stone would have been impossible to realize. As much as computer design may speed up some of the actual design and manufacturing, creating unique furniture, for Peter Donders is still pretty much a manual labour of love.

Chris Hardy [principal Chris Hardy Pty Ltd] Chris Hardy is an industrial designer with strong connections to the Australian design community. Most recently Chris has held a position as an Assistant Professor with University of Canberra, teaching industrial design students in areas of design theory, manufacturing, and computer aided design. He also leads a multi-tiered practice, specialising in product, furniture and lighting design. He also has extensive experience in design research and development, and providing expert design consulting services. Chris’s influences can be easily read in his work. Here elements of modernism, sustainability, user experience, and an understanding for manufacturing requirements come into play. Underscoring his work are principles of usability, refinement and importantly the ability to delight. Chris’s products – both furniture and lighting – have been recognised in competitions and exhibitions both nationally and internationally. Chris holds a Bachelor of Industrial Design with First Class Honors (UC) and Diploma of Interior Design (CIT).

Kasper Rønn von Lotzbeck [partner Norm.Architects]. Kasper has a wide experience within the field of product design, interiors and large scale architecture combined with an extensive technical insight. At Norm.Architects he is responsible for product design and furniture and his aim is to bring good design into the details of every project, large or small. Kasper is capable of bringing complex ideas to life and create maximum value in the design. He has a unique combination of artistic and technical insight and his designs have resulted in greatly increased brand value and turnover for the clients. Kasper has great experience working with almost any available material and his work has resulted in numerous design awards from all over the world. As co-founder and partner in Norm.Architects Kasper has been part of creating a world where products and architecture are linked closely together. Kasper holds a degree in architecture from the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Copenhagen from 2002.

David Trubridge [principal David Trubridge]. David Trubridge graduated as a Naval Architect from Newcastle University Britain, but since then he has worked as a furniture designer/maker. He settled in New Zealand after a five year yacht voyage with his family. His design process combines innate craft knowledge, sculptural abstraction and computer design technology, as it draws on his life’s rich experiences. He is New Zealand’s best known furniture/lighting designer and his work, which his own company in Hawkes Bay manufactures, is sold all around the world and exhibited at trade fairs in Milan (every year since 2001), Paris, London, New York, Dubai. Over recent years his designs have featured in countless international publications, including influential Italian magazines and even the Financial Times, as an instigator of the trend of ‘raw sophistication’ and as an exemplar of environmentally responsible design. In 2008 the French magazine Express listed him as one of the top 15 designers in the world. His Body Raft has been voted as iconic in New Zealand and in the best 50 designs of the twentieth century overseas, and his Coral light has been named as one of the top ten lights of the last 100 years by a Singapore magazine. Two lights, Nikau and Snowflake, won Red Dot awards in 2015. In 2007 he was given NZ’s highest design award, the John Britten Award, by the Designer’s Institute of NZ. In 2010 his Spiral Island set was included in the Design Triennale in New York and also won a Good Design Award. He is invited to speak regularly on sustainable design at conferences and symposia around the world. In 2013 Craig Potton Press published his autobiography ‘So Far’ which is also a design manifesto. His ‘Icarus’ installation, which was first shown in Milan in 2010, has been purchased by the Pompidou Centre in Paris for their permanent collection.

REGULATIONS

  1. This is an anonymous competition and the registration number is the only means of identification.
  2. The official language of the competition is English.
  3. The registration fee is non-refundable.
  4. Contacting the Jury is prohibited.
  5. eVolo Magazine, as the competition organizer, reserves the right to modify the competition schedule if deemed necessary.
  6. Entrants will be disqualified if any of the competition rules are not considered.
  7. Participation assumes acceptance of the regulations.
  8. Participants retain all copyrights of their designs. eVolo Magazine reserves the right to publish the projects as deemed necessary. Participants may publish their designs in other publications as well.

AWARDS

  • 1st Place: US $2000
  • 2nd Place: US $1000
  • 3rd Place: US: $500

Winners and projects selected by the Jury and editorial board will be published online and in print on eVolo Magazine’s publications and media partners.

-> REGISTER YOUR TEAM

Winners 2015 VMODERN Furniture Design Competition

eVolo Magazine is pleased to announce the winners of the 2015 VMODERN Furniture Design Competition. The award recognizes innovative design and creates a forum for the discussion and development of the discipline.  What is the future of furniture design?

eVolo Magazine received 233 entries from 34 different countries. The Jury selected 3 winners and 20 honorable mentions.

The first place was awarded to I-Ting Tsai, Xixi Zheng, Yiru Yun, and Somdatta Majumdar from the United Kingdom for the design of Fabric Chair.  This project is an investigation on the use of fabric as a structural material in furniture design. A special resin was developed to harden fabric placed on a rigid mold. The resin hardens the fabric to become structural while retaining its softness in specific locations.

Studio La Cube from Spain received the second place for their project Simmis Chair. This simple and elegant design is a study on symmetry and proportions. The goal was to create a dialogue between visual lightness and the strength and heaviness of wood and steel.

The third place was awarded to Open Source Workshop from Italy and the United States for the design of Helix, a diffuse furniture system that generates a continuous interior space by adapting simultaneously to any vertical and horizontal surface while defining an immersive spatial atmosphere.

The honorable mentions include materials explorations, the use of digital design and manufacturing processes as well as studies in ergonomics and experiential possibilities.

The members of the Jury are: Ammar Eloueini [principal Ammar Eloueini Digit-all Studio], Joel Escalona [principal Joel Escalona Studio, NONO], Mitchell Joachim [principal Terraform ONE], Po Shun Leong [principal Po Shun Leong Design], and Alexander Lervik [principal Lervik Design AB].

Fabric Chair

Fabric Chair

Fabric Chair

First Place
2015 VMODERN Furniture Design Competition

I-Ting Tsai, Xixi Zheng, Yiru Yun, and Somdatta Majumdar
Daniel Widrig, Soomeen Hahm and Stefan Bassing (tutors, Bartlett School of Architecture, UK)
United Kingdom

Fabric chair design is about creating a complex three-dimensional form from a flat sheet, using the traditional art of stitching. This felt composite creates structurally strong, intricate fluid shapes without the help of any mold or formwork which other materials like fiberglass would need.

Fabric in architecture and furniture has long existed but the invention of a composite that makes the fabric the main structural material is unique. Choosing a common off-the-shelf material like fabric and exploring its limits in another dimension was the motive behind this project. This technique of designing the two dimensional pattern which will fold up to the final object is like ‘fabric origami’.

Initially, different types of fabric were studied taking in consideration their elasticity, rigidity, permeability, etc. Initial concept prototypes were created to experiment this technique for smaller objects where double curvatures and the deformations of each pattern of the sheet were studied in detail to understand the forces behind the final forms achieved.

The same process of a machine cutting the felt and letting the fabric stand on its own while the composite is hardened created the chair design. The fabric itself becomes the legs, seat and backrest. The chair was created to show the potential of this design invention, which allows the transition from a 2D surface to a 3D object. Seamless designs are rare due to material size restriction but like the chair made of many components, it can create furniture with no visual seams.

The hardening material had to be very light to not deform the fabric with its weight. After lots of permutations and combinations of applying hardening materials to the fabric and checking different ratios of mixtures we came up with a particular ratio of some special resins. Once the chair is folded to its final form and attached to the scaffolding at minimum places, the resin is applied and the complex organic form freezes. Thus when the scaffolding is removed, the chair is rigid and strong.

The fabric is hard as stone in some places and soft in some parts, which is quite a unique feature, which most materials don’t offer. The overall texture still feels like felt, which is soft and warm. The material is breathable in the soft parts letting air to pass through and has a cozy comfortable cushion feel to it.

The Fabric chair challenges our minds, as fabric is not considered to be a strong material able to hold its own form.

Fabric Chair

Fabric Chair

Simmis Chair

Simmis Chair

Simmis Chair

Second Place
2015 VMODERN Furniture Design Competition

Studio La Cube
Spain

The Simmis Chair plays with its symmetry from different perspectives. There is symmetry between the wood parts, highlighted by a central incision, which is the key element of the chair’s aesthetics. This incision provides lightness, balance, and visual delicacy, which are counteracted by the strength of the material and the cubic form of the lower part. There is also a second symmetry which corresponds to the inclination of the lower cube and the back of the chair – the profiles of these two elements make a symmetric figure between the higher and the lower parts.

Simmis Chair

Simmis Chair

Helix

Helix

Helix

Third Place
2015 VMODERN Furniture Design Competition

Open Source Workshop. Marcella Del Signore, Giuseppe Morando, Elena Del Signore
Italy, United States

Helix is a diffuse furniture system that generates a continuous interior space by adapting simultaneously to any vertical and horizontal surface while defining an immersive spatial atmosphere. Its form recalls a natural system that emerges from the structure beneath.

Helix is modular and can be aggregated in different forms following the logic of spatial branching and growth. The spatial pattern is generated through the repetition of vertical zones (A and B) of the same base module that generates the 3D macro-aggregate surface cut through planes that emphasize the perspectival views of the sequence from the corridor to the interior space. The system morphs the space allowing the viewer to follow the visual continuous trajectory generated by the wrapper (wall + ceiling). The aggregate surface adapts in response to the specific site conditions and programmatic requirements with each module shaped by scripted rules.

It is manufactured through iterative procedures guided by a 5-Axis CNC wire able to carve out the modules from a solid mass of material. Helix is made of EPS- expanded polystyrene obtained by corn; it is completely recyclable and the manufacturing process helps to reduce CO2 emissions allowing the project to be completely executed through fully sustainable processes.  The structure is lightweight yet highly resistant due to the resin finish.

Helix investigates the notion of space-atmosphere, adaptability, reuse, and sustainable manufacturing processes.

Helix

Helix

Yodeesa Stool

Yodeesa Stool

Yodeesa Stool

Honorable Mention
2015 VMODERN Furniture Design Competition

Ivan Ho
Singapore

Yodeesa is a stool conceived around aesthetic and construction simplicity. The stool is made up of 3 major components, the seat (steel), the legs (ashwood) and the securing knob (modified plumbing valve knob). No tools or hardware is required to assemble/disassemble the stool.

Triggered by the study of a domestic stool, yodeesa’s objective is to break the stool down into its basic form/structure and to explore and understand the union of materials and simplifying assembly techniques. These explorations in turn lead to a series of ergonomic studies on the various tactile qualities of the stool. The flanged seat, thickness of legs, the plumbing valve knob, wow can all these elements enhance the user experience?

By applying these findings on materiality, construction and assembly. The stool can be easily taken apart and locked in place where the center intersection is located with a securing knob by hand within seconds. The stool can also be flat packed into a 680x400x50mm package.

Yodeesa Stool

Yodeesa Stool